Vogue Dissent

This attic's got a lot of shit in it.
The “Asian accent” tells the story of Chinese-American assimilation in a nutshell. Our parents have the accent that white Americans perceive as the most foreign out of all the possible alternatives, so our choice is to have no accent at all. The accent of our parents is the accent of the grimy streets of Chinatown with its mahjong parlors and fried food stalls and counterfeit jewelry, so we work to wipe away all traces of that world from our speech so we can settle comfortably into our roles as respectable middle-class doctors, lawyers, engineers, hundreds of miles from Chinatown.

No wonder we react so viscerally to the “ching-chong, ching-chong” schoolyard taunt. To attack our language, our ability to sound “normal,” is to attack our ability to be normal. It’s to attack everything we’ve worked for.

And make no mistake about it — to sound like a “normal” American is to wield privilege.

rococobutter:

So…if there is proof that both the Chinese and Ancient Egyptians were using the Pythagorean Theorem thousands of years before Pythagoras was born…why is it named after this guy? 

independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” by Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the…

(via ragstoreverie)

Intersectionality provides a basis for reconceptualizing race as a coalition between men and women of color. For example, in the area of rape, intersectionality provides a way of explaining why women of color must abandon the general argument that the interests of the community require the suppression of any confrontation around intraracial rape. Intersectionality may provide the means for dealing with other marginalizations as well. For example, race can also be a coalition of straight and gay people of color, and thus serve as a basis for critique of churches and other cultural institutions that reproduce heterosexism.
Kimberle Crenshaw, “Mapping the Margins” (via crunkfeministcollective)

bunnyfood:

Grisu the Mouse Rings Bells When He Wants to Come Inside 

(via laweblocavideo)

That accent is real, but my use of it can never be, not after so many years of renouncing it and avoiding it and exterminating any trace of it from my day-to-day speech. After a lifetime of rehearsals and training, the “announcer voice” is my voice, and the only reliable way to sound “less announcer-y” is to put on an accent that isn’t mine, be it Brooklyn, Biloxi or Beijing.

What a paradox. When I sound real, I’m fake, and when I sound fake, I’m real.

Arthur Chu, ”Breaking Out the Broken English

This.

(via 18mr)

micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring

It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 

Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 

(via black-australia)

theballetblog:

Under Armour’s new commercial, I Will What I Want, featuring Misty Copeland (American Ballet Theatre soloist)

Misty Copeland’s destiny was not to be a ballerina. But will trumps fate.

fascinasians:

fascinasians:

Join us tomorrow to talk about why Net Neutrality and the internet are so important to us! 42 national civil rights organizations recently signed on AGAINST net neutrality, it’s time to show them that we disagree! Tweet with us #MyInternetIs tomorrow at 12pm EST/9am PST!
Here are some examples (click to tweet!):
#MyInternetIs an open discussion space where I learn and grow from folks I would have otherwise never met. http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ
#MyInternetIs a free library on all the information I was never taught in schools. http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ
#MyInternetIs is the way I practice my 1st amendment rights. I won’t allow the FCC to influence my voice! http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ
#MyInternetIs my safe space where I determine what’s “high-demand”. I don’t prioritize aspects of my identity! http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ
Confused about Net Neutrality? The “Save the Internet Campaign” summarizes it like this:


What Is Net Neutrality?
Net Neutrality is the fundamental principle that ensures you can read, watch or download whatever you want — and it’s not up to a phone or cable company to decide which websites will work.


Why Is Net Neutrality So Important?
Net Neutrality has made the Internet an unrivaled environment for free speech, civic participation, innovation, opportunity, press freedom and much more. It prevents online discrimination and gives any individual, organization or company the same chance to share their ideas and find an audience.


How Is Net Neutrality at Risk?
The FCC’s proposal would let a handful of giant Internet companies become the gatekeepers of everything we do, say and see online. If the FCC’s rules go into effect, Internet service providers will be allowed to favor their own content and charge extra fees to others for VIP treatment. This would create a two-tiered Internet with express lanes for the few who can afford the tolls — and winding dirt roads for the rest of us.


What Can We Do About It?
To ensure decision-makers hear from millions of Internet users and not just a few big companies, Free Press is mounting an all-out campaign to organize public support for Net Neutrality. If we succeed, the open Internet will continue to thrive as a space shared and shaped by its millions of users.



HAPPENING NOW!

fascinasians:

fascinasians:

Join us tomorrow to talk about why Net Neutrality and the internet are so important to us! 42 national civil rights organizations recently signed on AGAINST net neutrality, it’s time to show them that we disagree! Tweet with us #MyInternetIs tomorrow at 12pm EST/9am PST!

Here are some examples (click to tweet!):

#MyInternetIs an open discussion space where I learn and grow from folks I would have otherwise never met. http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ

#MyInternetIs a free library on all the information I was never taught in schools. http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ

#MyInternetIs is the way I practice my 1st amendment rights. I won’t allow the FCC to influence my voice! http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ

#MyInternetIs my safe space where I determine what’s “high-demand”. I don’t prioritize aspects of my identity! http://bit.ly/1aqjmEJ

Confused about Net Neutrality? The “Save the Internet Campaign” summarizes it like this:

  • What Is Net Neutrality?

    Net Neutrality is the fundamental principle that ensures you can read, watch or download whatever you want — and it’s not up to a phone or cable company to decide which websites will work.

  • Why Is Net Neutrality So Important?

    Net Neutrality has made the Internet an unrivaled environment for free speech, civic participation, innovation, opportunity, press freedom and much more. It prevents online discrimination and gives any individual, organization or company the same chance to share their ideas and find an audience.

  • How Is Net Neutrality at Risk?

    The FCC’s proposal would let a handful of giant Internet companies become the gatekeepers of everything we do, say and see online. If the FCC’s rules go into effect, Internet service providers will be allowed to favor their own content and charge extra fees to others for VIP treatment. This would create a two-tiered Internet with express lanes for the few who can afford the tolls — and winding dirt roads for the rest of us.

  • What Can We Do About It?

    To ensure decision-makers hear from millions of Internet users and not just a few big companies, Free Press is mounting an all-out campaign to organize public support for Net Neutrality. If we succeed, the open Internet will continue to thrive as a space shared and shaped by its millions of users.

HAPPENING NOW!